the distance between objects in space are so great that units other than miles or kilometers are often used. For example the astronomical unit (AU) is the average distance between earth and the sun or 92,900,000 miles. use this information to convert the distance of some planet in miles from its stars to astronomical unit. the planet is 893.1 million miles from the star. what is the distance between the planet and the star?

Awainaideannagi 2022-07-25 Answered
the distance between objects in space are so great that units other than miles or kilometers are often used. For example the astronomical unit (AU) is the average distance between earth and the sun or 92,900,000 miles. use this information to convert the distance of some planet in miles from its stars to astronomical unit. the planet is 893.1 million miles from the star.
what is the distance between the planet and the star?
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Answers (1)

Lillianna Mendoza
Answered 2022-07-26 Author has 16 answers
92900000 mles = 1AU
893.1 *10^6 miles = ?Au
893.1*10^6/92900000 = 9.61 AU
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