The medians of a triangle are the line segments from each vertex to the midpoint of the opposite side.Find the lengths of the medians of the trangle with vertices at A=(0,0), B=(6,0), and C= (4,4).

yasusar0 2022-07-27 Answered
The medians of a triangle are the line segments from each vertex to the midpoint of the opposite side.Find the lengths of the medians of the trangle with vertices at A=(0,0), B=(6,0), and C= (4,4).
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Answers (1)

Eve Good
Answered 2022-07-28 Author has 18 answers
A=(0,0), B=(6,0), and C= (4,4).
M is a midpoint of |AB|
M ( x , y ) = ( 0 + 6 2 , 0 + 0 2 ) = ( 3 , 0 )
according to your figure | M C | = ( 4 3 ) 2 + ( 4 0 ) 2 = 1 + 16 = 17
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