For the line given by, y = -4 x - 4 , find the slope of a line that is: a) Parallel to the given line: m_{parallel} = b) Perpendicular to the given line: m_{perpendicular} =

Deromediqm 2022-07-26 Answered
For the line given by, y = -4 x - 4 , find the slope of a line that is:
a) Parallel to the given line: m_{parallel} =
b) Perpendicular to the given line: m_{perpendicular} =
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Answers (2)

dominicsheq8
Answered 2022-07-27 Author has 15 answers
y = -4x - 4
(a) slope = -4
(b) slope = -1/ ( -4)
= 1/4
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jlo2ni5x
Answered 2022-07-28 Author has 8 answers
the general form of a line is y=mx+c, where m is the slope. Hence slope of the given line= -4. Lines which are parallel have the same slope hence Mparallel= -4.
When two lines are perpendicular, the product of their slopes = -1. Hence Mperpendicular= 1/4
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