Suppose a spring with stiffness k, is strained by constant forces on each end. In a frame where the strained spring moves at a constant velocity, what's the total relativistic energy of the moving strained string as k->oo?

smuklica8i 2022-07-20 Answered
Suppose a spring with stiffness k, is strained by constant forces on each end.
In a frame where the strained spring moves at a constant velocity, what's the total relativistic energy of the moving strained string as k ?
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Answers (1)

Raul Garrett
Answered 2022-07-21 Author has 14 answers
The energy is the same no matter what the strain. The stiffness affects the compression of the spring, not the energy. In other words the higher k is the higher the energy density it has in terms of (potential energy)/(strain).
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