Why does water freeze at 0 ∘C while poultry freezes at −2.2 C?

Zoagliaj 2022-07-20 Answered
Why does water freeze at 0 ∘C while poultry freezes at −2.2 ∘C?
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Answers (1)

Sandra Randall
Answered 2022-07-21 Author has 17 answers
As we also all know that salt water has a freezing point much lower than 0C (and a boiling point higher than 100C). This is because of changes in the entropy of the solution (see the wiki for more details).
The cells in poultry (and the "stuff" in between the cells) don't contain pure, distilled water (which freezes at 0C), but "polluted" water (which freezes at temperatures slightly below 0C).
Actually, most organic things freeze at temperatures slightly off 0C for the same reasons. I remember a few of my colleagues doing an experiment on frozen salt-water fish, and they discovered that they couldn't bear the smell after a few hours, because they kept it at 0C (instead of the (roughly) -6 C they should have kept it at to keep it frozen).
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