Explain Does Newton’s second law hold true for an observer in a van as it speeds up, slows down, or rounds a corner?

Pierre Holmes 2022-07-21 Answered
Explain Does Newton’s second law hold true for an observer in a van as it speeds up, slows down, or rounds a corner?
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Answers (1)

autarhie6i
Answered 2022-07-22 Author has 18 answers
A person traveling in a vehicle has the same velocity as the velocity of the vehicle. The effective velocity of the person speeds up as slow down with respect to the speed of the vehicle.
When the car takes a turn, the person in the car is subjected to have same centripetal force that is been experienced by the car.
This tells why the person still moves forward when the car stops abruptly. Therefore, Newton’s second law is applicable to any body in motion.
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