Is the classical Doopler Effect, for light shift, 1−v/c , exact? What is it an approximation of?

Marcelo Mullins 2022-07-23 Answered
Is the classical Doopler Effect, for light shift, 1 v / c, exact? What is it an approximation of?
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Answers (1)

Seromaniaru
Answered 2022-07-24 Author has 12 answers
He is comparing 1 v 1 + v to the classical Doppler shift ( 1 v ) (where v is the velocity divided by с, since use units where c = 1). The formula you give 1 v 1 + v doesn't have a classical interpretation, and Einstein reduces to Doppler's at slow speeds.
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