For a chemical reaction, it is well-known that /_\ H=H_(products)-H_(reactants) Are we physically unable to determine an absolute H?

Almintas2l 2022-07-23 Answered
For a chemical reaction, it is well-known that
Δ H = H products H reactants
Are we physically unable to determine an absolute H?
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Answers (1)

Julianna Bell
Answered 2022-07-24 Author has 19 answers
Yes; since we are unable to determine an absolute energy U and since enthalpy H U + P V, we are unable to determine an absolute enthalpy (or Helmholtz free energy or Gibbs free energy or chemical potential or anything that includes U).
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