I know that the energy of a photon can just be found from the equation E = hv. However, if we measure light as a wave, can the energy be found from the amplitude rather than the frequency, like you would with classical waves? If not, why do we say that light can be described as both a wave and a particle if the equations for waves don't work?

ingwadlatp 2022-07-22 Answered
I know that the energy of a photon can just be found from the equation E = hv. However, if we measure light as a wave, can the energy be found from the amplitude rather than the frequency, like you would with classical waves? If not, why do we say that light can be described as both a wave and a particle if the equations for waves don't work?
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losnonamern
Answered 2022-07-23 Author has 12 answers
I do not understand the expression "measure light as a wave" , it is not possible to measure something as a wave, we can only describe something as a wave. And of course there is an equation for an energy in the electromagnetic wave theory, it is
E n e r g y = V ( E 2 ( x , y , z ) + H 2 ( x , y , z ) 8 π ) d x d y d z
which is proportional to the square of the amplitude.
And what is about:"why we say that light can be described as both a wave and a particle ?" It is because wave theory are perfectly explains the spread of light( diffraction and interference), but incorrectly explains absorption and radiation of light, what particle theory does.
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