Metal object attached to an electromagnet that would otherwise fall to Earth. Does the magnetic field do work in resisting the fall? If so what are the force carriers? Indeed what are the force carriers in the (relativistically related) phenomena of electric attraction and repulsion?

Alonzo Odom 2022-07-22 Answered
Metal object attached to an electromagnet that would otherwise fall to Earth. Does the magnetic field do work in resisting the fall? If so what are the force carriers? Indeed what are the force carriers in the (relativistically related) phenomena of electric attraction and repulsion?
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Answers (1)

Alden Holder
Answered 2022-07-23 Author has 15 answers
No displacement - no work.
As far as force carriers are concerned... Do you actually need this? The question is perfectly answerable within classical mechanics/electrodynamics, and the answer is easy. Force is 'carried' by the electromagnetic field. If you start diving into quantum field theory the force will still be carried by the electromagnetic field, but now you will need to quantize the field (and you will get photons).
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