Does heating an electromagnet cause change in its magnetic field as well and vice versa?

amacorrit80 2022-07-20 Answered
Does heating an electromagnet cause change in its magnetic field as well and vice versa?
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Answers (1)

Tolamaes04
Answered 2022-07-21 Author has 12 answers
your electromagnet is an inductor powered by a battery with constant potential V. The magnetic field is proportional to the intensity running on the wires. B I. We know: V = R I, where R is the resistance of the inductor. Its a very simple model as you can see...
For a small variation of temperature from initial temperature T 0 , the resistance can be approximated with a linear relation:
R = R ( T 0 ) [ 1 + α ( T T 0 ) ]
find α for a given material arround T 0 that you want to work with. So, in the vicinity of T 0 , and with the temperature coeficient α measured/given, we can now conclude:
- If α > 0, resistance increases, current decreases, magnetic field decreases.
- If α < 0, resistance decreases, current increases, magnetic field increases.
- If α = 0, resistance decreases, current increases, magnetic field increases.
Temperature coeficient arround T 0 = 293 K
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