A beam of gamma-ray having a photon of energy 510 keV is incident on a foil of aluminum. Calculate the wavelength of the radiation scattered at 90 degrees

Bruno Thompson 2022-07-22 Answered
A beam of gamma-ray having a photon of energy 510 keV is incident on a foil of aluminum. Calculate the wavelength of the radiation scattered at 90 degrees
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Answers (1)

eishale2n
Answered 2022-07-23 Author has 15 answers
Given the beam of gamma-ray of energy 510 keV is incident on the aluminum foil. The wavelength will be given by,
λ 0 = h c E
λ 0 = ( 6.63 × 10 34   J s ) ( 3 × 10 8   m s 1 ) ( 510 × 10 3 × 1.6 × 10 19   J ) = 2.426 × 10 12   m
Now wavelength of the scattered radiation is given by,
λ = λ 0 + h m 0 c ( 1 cos θ )
λ = 4.85 × 10 12   m
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