How are solenoids and electromagnets used in galvanometers, electric motors, and loudspeakers?

Braylon Lester 2022-07-23 Answered
How are solenoids and electromagnets used in galvanometers, electric motors, and loudspeakers?
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Answers (1)

Reinfarktq6
Answered 2022-07-24 Author has 18 answers
These devices change electrical energy into the mechanical energy
They change electrical energy into mechanical.
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