At what velocity does a proton have a 6.00-fm wavelength (about the size of a nucleus)? Assume the proton is nonrelativistic. (1 femtometer = 10^(−15) m. )

makaunawal5 2022-07-20 Answered
At what velocity does a proton have a 6.00-fm wavelength (about the size of a nucleus)? Assume the proton is nonrelativistic. (1 femtometer = 10 15 m . )
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Answers (1)

emerhelienapj
Answered 2022-07-21 Author has 14 answers
The de Broglie equation is,
v = h m proton λ
Therefore,
v = 6.62 × 10 34 k g m 2 / s ( 1.67 × 10 27 k g ) ( 6.00 × 10 15 m ) = 6.61 × 10 7 m / s
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