A sample of ideal gas has an internal

Abdii Diroo 2022-07-25

A sample of ideal gas has an internal energy U and is then compressed to one half of its original volume while the temperature stays the same. What is the new internal energy of the ideal gas?

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asked 2022-05-07
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For a fluid with viscosity to flow through a pipe that has the same cross-sectional area at both ends, at a constant velocity, there has to be a pressure difference according to Poiseuille's Law. Why exactly is there a change in pressure required to keep the velocity constant?
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asked 2022-05-13
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Is there a contradiction between the continuity equation and Poiseuilles Law?
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