What type of energy should I use when describing the amount of energy available to increase entropy of a system?

ingwadlatp 2022-07-19 Answered
What type of energy should I use when describing the amount of energy available to increase entropy of a system?
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Answers (1)

Jazlene Dickson
Answered 2022-07-20 Author has 15 answers
Rearranging the definition of the Helmholtz free energy,
F = U T S ,
we obtain
so that the amount of entropy is determined by the difference in the internal and Helmholtz free energies. Qualitatively, then, if the Helmholtz free energy can significantly change, it can affect the entropy.
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