A ball rolls down an inclined plane with an acceleration of 6 ft/sec? What initial velocity must be given for the ball to roll 300 feet a), 15 ft/sec b) 25 ft/sec c) 0 ft/sec d) 10 ft/sec

Hayley Bernard 2022-07-19 Answered
A ball rolls down an inclined plane with an acceleration of 6   f t / s e c 2 ? What initial velocity must be given for the ball to roll 300 feet
a), 15 ft/sec
b) 25 ft/sec
c) 0 ft/sec
d) 10 ft/sec
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Answers (1)

Steven Bates
Answered 2022-07-20 Author has 15 answers
Initial velocity= V 0
Velocity after t times v ( t ) = v 0 + a t
a=acceleration
s=total distance
s = 4 t + 1 2 a t 2
300 = 10 × u + 1 2 × 6 × 100
300=10 u +300
10u=0
u=0
option (c) correct
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