Does photon behave as both a particle and a wave? Explain.

Marisol Rivers 2022-07-18 Answered
Does photon behave as both a particle and a wave? Explain.
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Answers (1)

Tolamaes04
Answered 2022-07-19 Author has 12 answers
Light is made of small perfectly,elastic particles called photons.
Particle nature of photon :-
1. particles have momentum and kinetic energy and wavelength.
2. According to photoelectric effect when a light of certain frequency is incident on metal surface the emitted photons will have momentum ,K.E .
3. While we explain about compton effect even light consists of collection of small particles called photons
4. This shows the particle nature of photon.
Wave nature of photon :-
1. Wave will transport energy in medium and it exhibit different phenomena like interference, difraction and polarisation.
2. In youngs double slit experiment when light made to pass through the slits it forms interference pattern on screen.
3. So light is made of photons and they behave like a wave.
CONCLUSSION:- Photon has both particle and wave nature.
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