It is well established that the photon is the propagator for the electromagnetic force. How are the set of photons used in the H-field behaving differently than those in the E-field? Is it different when dealing with an electromagnet versus an intrinsic magnet? In what way do the photons need to be emitted by a bar magnet to result in a magnetic interaction? How about a charged object to interact with a charged object?

Braylon Lester 2022-07-14 Answered
It is well established that the photon is the propagator for the electromagnetic force. How are the set of photons used in the H-field behaving differently than those in the E-field? Is it different when dealing with an electromagnet versus an intrinsic magnet? In what way do the photons need to be emitted by a bar magnet to result in a magnetic interaction? How about a charged object to interact with a charged object?
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Answers (1)

Shelby Strong
Answered 2022-07-15 Author has 9 answers
The virtual photons that represent the static Coulomb potential, so the electric field, have time polarisation and those representing the static vector potential, so the magnetic field, have spatial polarisation.

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