X is a discrete uniform distribution on 1 , 2 , &#x2026;<!-- … --> , n

Keenan Santos 2022-07-14 Answered
X is a discrete uniform distribution on 1 , 2 , , n. I know that the median is n + 1 2 for odd n. I need to find median when n is even. Would it be n 2 or n 2 + 1, whichever is greater?
Also, is every point mode as PDF has highest values there? So there are n modes - 1 , 2 , , n?
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Answers (1)

Maggie Bowman
Answered 2022-07-15 Author has 14 answers
To answer the first question, think of how to handle the case where n = 2.
what is the median for uniform distribution on 1 , 2?
For the second question, yes, there are n modes.

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asked 2022-07-09
According to the definition I read, it came to my notice that the number with highest frequency has to be a mode for a given data set, but then what if I have all the numbers as distinct... In that scenario we won't have a particular number having a frequency more than other elements in the data set... Now if I consider a case when we have 2 numbers in a dataset with same max number of occurrences like:
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