I'm struggling with the following question for long. I tried to apply isoperimetric inequality 4

Salvador Bush 2022-07-07 Answered
I'm struggling with the following question for long. I tried to apply isoperimetric inequality 4 π A L 2 , but my attempt has been unsuccessful. Could anyone give me a hint?

Let A B be a segment of straight line and let l > length of A B. Show that the curve C joining A and B, with length l, and such that together with A B bounds the largest possible area is an arc of a circle passing through A and B.
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Answers (1)

Pranav Greer
Answered 2022-07-08 Author has 13 answers
Approximate the curve with a sequence of connected straight line segments. Combine this with the straight line segment AB to form a polygon. Now use the theorem that the polygon with maximum area, given the sides, can be circumscribed by a circle.

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