In a study looking at undergraduate students’ perceptions of sense of community at their university,

Eden Solomon 2022-07-01 Answered
In a study looking at undergraduate students’ perceptions of sense of community at their university, a researcher hypothesizes that the farther away students live from campus (in miles), the less they feel they are part of the university community. The researcher collected data for the following two variables – miles from campus and part of community (rating from 1-10 of how much they felt part of the university community).
what is the scale of measurement? (i.e., nominal, ordinal, interval or ratio)
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Answers (1)

Leland Ochoa
Answered 2022-07-02 Author has 25 answers
There are four scales of measurements:
1) Nominal scale: In this type of measurement, the categories are divided and represented by unique names or numbers. For example, The male is represented as '0' and the female as '1'.
2) Ordinal scale: In this type of measurement of scale, the variables are ordered or ranked according to the researcher's preference.
3) Interval scale: In this measurement of scale, the variable can take value any value that falls within the interval. Here, the difference between the two numbers can be easily determined.
4) Ratio scale: In this measurement of scale, the researcher can easily establish the differences. Also, the ratio scale has a property of absolute zero; this implies that no negative values are included. For example, the height and weight of an individual can be measured with this scale.
In the given scenario, there are two variables:
A) Miles from campus: The scale of measurement for this variable is Ratio. This variable takes the numerical values, and the difference between the miles cannot be negative.
Thus, the scale of measurement for this variable is Ratio.
B) Part of community: The scale of measurement for this variable is Ordinal. As the part of the community is ranked from 1 to 10 and according to one's preference, the ranking can be given.
Thus, the scale of measurement is Ordinal.
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