Having difficulties with signed numbers when it comes to multiplication, division, addition and subtraction. Is there a simpler way to remember how to use the signs in math problems?

Wotzdorfg 2021-03-07 Answered
Having difficulties with signed numbers when it comes to multiplication, division, addition and subtraction. Is there a simpler way to remember how to use the signs in math problems?
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Ayesha Gomez
Answered 2021-03-08 Author has 104 answers

Let two negative numbers be -a and -b. For example : -2 and -5.
Let us consider the rules for individual arithmatic operations:
Addition of 2 negatuve numbers:
a+(b): negative
e.g, 2+(5)=7
Substraction of 2 negative numbers:
(a)(b) is negtive if |a|>|b| and positive therwise.
e.g, (2)(5)=2+5=3 (positive) as |2|<|5|
Multiplication of 2 negative numbers:
(a)(b)=ab: positive
e.g., (2)(5)=10
Division of 2 negative numbers:
ab: positive
e.g, 25=0.40

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