Interpreting z-scores: Complete the following statements using your knowledge about z-scores. a. If the data is weight, the z-score for someone who is

Dillard 2021-02-23 Answered
Interpreting z-scores: Complete the following statements using your knowledge about z-scores.
a. If the data is weight, the z-score for someone who is overweight would be
-positive
-negative
-zero
b. If the data is IQ test scores, an individual with a negative z-score would have a
-high IQ
-low IQ
-average IQ
c. If the data is time spent watching TV, an individual with a z-score of zero would
-watch very little TV
-watch a lot of TV
-watch the average amount of TV
d. If the data is annual salary in the U.S and the population is all legally employed people in the U.S., the z-scores of people who make minimum wage would be
-positive
-negative
-zero
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Expert Answer

wornoutwomanC
Answered 2021-02-24 Author has 81 answers
Step 1
Standardized z-score:
The standardized z-score represents the number of standard deviations the data point is away from the mean.
If the z-score takes positive value when it is above the mean (0).
If the z-score takes negative value when it is below the mean (0).
(a)
Interpreting the z-score for the statement “ if the data is weight, the z-score for someone who is overweight”.
The z-score is interpreted below as follows:
From the information, given the statement is “if the data is weight, the z-score for someone who is overweight” which indicates that the z-score represent the positive score since because the word overweight represents positive value.
Correct option: Positive.
Step 2
(b)
Interpreting the z-score for the statement “If the data is IQ test scores, an individual with a negative z-score would have”.
The z-score is interpreted below as follows:
From the information, given the statement If the data is IQ test scores, an individual with a negative z-score would have” which indicates that the z-score represent the negative score since because the word negative score represents low IQ value.
Correct option: Low IQ.
(c )
Interpreting the z-score for the statement “If the data is time spent watching TV, then an individual with a z-score of zero would”.
The z-score is interpreted below as follows:
From the information, given the statement “If the data is time spent watching TV, an individual with a z-score of zero would” which indicates that the z-score represent the average score since because the word 0 represents average amount of watching the TV.
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