Proving that the water leaving a vertical pipe is exponential (decay) How can I prove that the rat

hetriamhageh6k20 2022-05-18 Answered
Proving that the water leaving a vertical pipe is exponential (decay)
How can I prove that the rate of which water leaves a vertical cylindrical container (through a hole at the bottom) is exponential of the form :
A e k x
I know that Torricelli's law is:
2 g h
But this only proves a square root relationship. I have data points every 10 seconds and graphed it suggests a decay function. I know the distance between the pipe is 1.5M and the internal diameter is 5cm. The hole diameter is 0.25cm, if this helps. I need to prove that the water leaving the pipe is exponentially decaying.
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Answers (1)

kazneni3tr2b
Answered 2022-05-19 Author has 18 answers
We don't give solutions to homework problems, but we can explore the physics a bit.
You need to set up a differential equation for the change in height with time. The way to do this is to note that if the speed of the water flowing out through the hole is v, and the area of the hole is a, then the volume flowing out per second is just a v. The outflow per second is just the change in the volume in the pipe, so we get the differential equation:
d V d t = a v
where V is the volume in the pipe. The next step is to note that if the area of the pipe is A then the volume in the pipe is V = A h and because A is constant:
d V d t = A d h d t
So our equation for d V / d t turns into:
d h d t = a A v
You mention Torricelli's law. If you use this to substitute for v it's going to give you:
(1) d h d t = a 2 g A h 1 / 2
We solve differential equations like this by rearranging to give:
d h h 1 / 2 = a 2 g A d t
and then just integrate:
d h h 1 / 2 = a 2 g A d t
But this isn't going to give you an exponential decay of h with time. If you measure an exponential decay (you don't say whether this is what you measure in the experiment) then Torricelli's law cannot apply.
Torricelli's law is based on inertial forces i.e. it balances the potential energy lost as the liquid falls with the kinetic energy gained at the outflow. However in fluid dynamics there are always two effects to consider - inertial forces and viscous forces. Torricelli's law considers only inertial forces and ignores viscosity of the liquid, so it applies only when inertial forces dominate. When viscous forces dominate the flow velocity will be determined by the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and that gives a different dependence of the velocity on the pressure:
v P h
This is going to change our differential equation to:
(2) d h d t C h
for some constant C that will depend on the geometry of the hole and the viscosity of the fluid. Without going into the details, this will give you an exponential decay of h with time.
So how h varies with time in your experiment is going to depend on the details i.e. whether inertial or viscous forces dominate. I think you need to graph ln ( h ) against time and h against time and see which gives you a straight line.
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