Use the sample data to construct a scatterplot. Use the first variable for the x-axis. Based on the scatterplot, what do you conclude about a linear correlation? The table li sts che t sizes (di stance around chest in inches) and weights (pounds) of anesthetized bears that were measured. begin{array}{|c|c|}hline text{Chest(in.)} & amp, 26 & amp, 45 & amp, 54 & amp, 49 & amp, 35 & amp, 41 & amp, 41 hline text{Weight(lb)} & amp, 80 & amp, 344 & amp, 416 & amp, 348 & amp, 166 & amp, 220 & amp, 262 hline end{array}

Question
Scatterplots
asked 2020-12-05
Use the sample data to construct a scatterplot.
Use the first variable for the x-axis. Based on the scatterplot, what do you conclude about a linear correlation?
The table li sts che t sizes (di stance around chest in inches) and weights (pounds) of anesthetized bears that were measured.
\(\displaystyle{b}{e}{g}\in{\left\lbrace{a}{r}{r}{a}{y}\right\rbrace}{\left\lbrace{\left|{c}\right|}{c}{\mid}\right\rbrace}{h}{l}\in{e}\text{Chest(in.)}&{a}\mp,\ {26}&{a}\mp,\ {45}&{a}\mp,\ {54}&{a}\mp,\ {49}&{a}\mp,\ {35}&{a}\mp,\ {41}&{a}\mp,\ {41}\backslash{h}{l}\in{e}\text{Weight(lb)}&{a}\mp,\ {80}&{a}\mp,\ {344}&{a}\mp,\ {416}&{a}\mp,\ {348}&{a}\mp,\ {166}&{a}\mp,\ {220}&{a}\mp,\ {262}\backslash{h}{l}\in{e}{e}{n}{d}{\left\lbrace{a}{r}{r}{a}{y}\right\rbrace}\)

Answers (1)

2020-12-06
Step 1
SCATTERPLOT
Chest is on the horizontal axis and Weight is on the vertical axis.
image
Step 2
The appears to be a linear correlation, because the points in the scatterplot lie roughly on a straight line.
0

Relevant Questions

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\(A. 20602060xf(x)\)
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...