Uses of Wien's law of displacement Wiens's displacement law says <mrow class="MJX-TeXA

Landon Mckinney 2022-05-15 Answered
Uses of Wien's law of displacement
Wiens's displacement law says
λ max T = a constant
So if I have the λ max , I can find the temperature of a star. But if I have the temperature, is there any point in calculating λ max ? What information does that give us of the star, besides temperature?
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Answers (1)

Allyson Gonzalez
Answered 2022-05-16 Author has 24 answers
So, let's start with the formal definition of peak wavelength. Peak wavelength ( λ m a x ) is the wavelength where an object absorbs the most photons (or, to our eyes, becomes more dark, or, at a darker point, completely isn't in the visible spectrum. (for a refresher, take a look at the electromagnetic spectrum, and here's something to look at as you go: electromagnetic spectrum)
Well, back to your question, why do we even have λ m a x , and what is it used for? So, I did a bit of research in an astrochemistry textbook that I have, and found a reason why peak wavelength is useful. It is useful as a parameter to compare the quality of several types of molecules.
Hopefully this was helpful in answering your question!
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