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London Ware 2022-05-13 Answered
On a linear X temperature scale, water freezes at 125.0 0 X and boils at 360.0 0 X. On a linear Y scale, water freezes at 70.00 0 Y and boils at 30.00 0 Y. A temperature of 50.00 0 Y corresponds to what temperature on the X scale?
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Answers (1)

Gary Salinas
Answered 2022-05-14 Author has 13 answers
If you rearrange your equation to solve for Y,
Y = ( X + 125 ) 30 + 70 360 + 125 70
This reduces to
Y = 8 X 5790 97 = 0.08247 X + 59.6907 0.08 X 60
which is about what the textbook obtains.
The difference in values you are getting is completely due to the approximation that the solution manual uses. If you use the exact values, as you did, you will indeed get 1330. If you use the approximate values as the solution manual did, then you will indeed get 1375.
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