What is MIP hypothesis? While reading about muon analysis I read that finding calorimetry segments

Thaddeus Sanders 2022-05-15 Answered
What is MIP hypothesis?
While reading about muon analysis I read that finding calorimetry segments along with the tracks in the silicon tracker for muons helps us find a subset of tracks compatible with the MIP hypothesis. I was looking for what MIP means and all I could find is Minimum Ionizing Particle. Does MIP mean that and what is the MIP hypothesis?
You can still ask an expert for help

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

Solve your problem for the price of one coffee

  • Available 24/7
  • Math expert for every subject
  • Pay only if we can solve it
Ask Question

Answers (1)

noruegezajl00y
Answered 2022-05-16 Author has 13 answers
The relationship between the energy detected in (a large class of) ionizing detectors and the distance traveled depends a bit on the energy of the particle, but the curve has a valley and is only weakly sensitive to speed in that valley (and the speed of minimum ionization also depends on the particle mass).
The rate of energy deposition for particles at the bottom of the valley is called 'minimum ionization'.
A minimum ionizing particle (MIP) is one that has the speed that generate minimum ionization.
The hypothesis here is that the track length is connected to the detector response by the assumption that the particle's speed is in the valley. So this is a analysis method (rather than a result you are hoping to publish) that works by saying
"Assume [some fact] about the thing we've detected and use that to work out more details, then later we'll look to see if the fit that results is consistent with what we assumed."
And because the minimium ionization valley is pretty broad and a lot of particles are roughly qualified this works out very well.
Not exactly what you’re looking for?
Ask My Question

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

Relevant Questions

asked 2022-05-15
Calorimetry - Emitted Joules
How can one calculate the total amount of emitted joules from an object with a temperature that isn't constant? A great start is this formula:
P = σ • A • (T^4)
If the formula is translated from sybmols to units it will look like this:
J/s = σ • (m^2) • (K^4)
(J/s) is joules emitted per second from an object. ( σ ) is the Stefan Boltzmann constant, 5.67•(10^−8). (m^2) is the area of the object. (K^4) is the temperature of the object, in Kelvin, to the power of 4. Now, if I transform the formula:
J = σ • (m^2) • (K^4) • s
Now one can get total amount of joules emitted ( J ) during a certain time ( s ), if one know the temperature and area. To the tricky part: what if the temperature isn't constant? The temperature will depend on how many joules that has already been emitted. And the joules that are being emitted will depend on the temperature.
How can I solve this? Do I need to combine this with an other formula?
Best regards! Please comment if something is unclear!
asked 2022-05-15
A Calorimetry Problem
I have a question in calorimetry from an old competitive exam. The question is:
The temperature of 100 grams of water is to be raised from 24 C to 90 C by adding steam to it. Find the mass of steam required.
I tried attempting the question by assuming that the added steam would convert back to water and thus lose an amount of heat calculated by the latent heat of vaporization. Additionally, to cool from 100 degrees to 90 degrees, the 'watered steam' will contribute some additional heat. I equated this to the heat gained by the 100 grams of water to reach 90 degrees from 24 degrees. But I am not getting the right answer!
I would appreciate any help on this matter. Thank you :)
asked 2022-05-18
How can scintillation gamma-spectrometers work given that track length is different for different angles?
As far as I understand, the basic principle of gamma spectrometer is simple - gamma ray hits scintillator, it generates number of photons which roughly proportional to gamma ray energy. Then we need to detect these secondary photons and plot a nice graph.
But as far as I see, scintillator size is typically too small to completely absorb gamma photon. Which also means that gamma photons coming from different angles will have different track lengths inside scintillator - and should generate different amount of light for the same gamma ray energy.
So, how can this work at all?
asked 2022-05-07
How to derive the formula for heat produced due to electricity correctly from Joule's laws for heating?
From Joule's laws, we get this:
H I 2 R t
H = K I 2 R t . . . ( i )
Now, we have to find/define the value of K. According to my book, when 1 A of current passes through a conductor of 1 Ω for 1 s, 1 J heat is produced. If that's the case, then from ( i ) we get this:
1 = K × 1 × 1 × 1
K = 1
Therefore, we get our nice little formula:
H = K I 2 R t
My question with the above derivation is, how did we find that when 1 A of current passes through a conductor of 1 Ω for 1 s, 1 J heat is produced? Through experimentation? What was the name of the experiment and who conducted it?
asked 2022-05-20
What would be the temperature of the resultant mixture?
The question in my textbook reads
100 g of water is supercooled to - 10 C. At this point, due to some disturbance mechanised or otherwise some of it suddenly freezes to ice. What will be the temperature of the resultant mixture and how much mass would freeze?
I am well aware of the concepts and principle of Calorimetry but I can't seem to get a clear picture of the question.
My doubts include -
1.Why doesn't the whole water in the beaker freeze?
2.Why does some part of the water in the beaker act as a source of heat to raise the temperature of the remaining water?
3.Why is the equilibrium attained at 0 C?
asked 2022-05-15
What quantity remains conserved in a calorimeter when two bodies at different temperatures are mixed?
This is the question:
Two identical bodies at different temperatures are mixed in a calorimeter. Which of the following quantities remains conserved?
1) Sum of the temperatures of the two bodies 2) Total heat of the two bodies 3) Total internal energy of the two bodies 4) Internal energy of each body
As we take a calorimeter to be an isolated system, internal energy of the two bodies would remain conserved. But why won't the total heat be conserved? The principle of calorimetry states that total heat gained is equal to total heat lost. I can't figure out what I'm missing here, and I'm very confused. Any help is appreciated.
asked 2022-05-17
Calorimetry Problem
I was doing a problem in thermodynamics where the net heat is 0.
I don't understand why if you have say a copper calorimeter with water at say 15 °C and add a mass of copper at a higher temperature say 90 °C that when calculating the final temperature you would use for the copper piece this in the formula:
Q = m c ( T f T i )
Q = m c ( T f T i )
Where f is for final and i is for initial. Say mass is 0.3 kg. I was told that regarding T f T i I would need to use 90 T. This problem was to work out the final temperature of the system. Why was the initial 90 °C of the added copper substituted with T f in the heat equation?