In nuclear fusion, the colliding particle unites with the parent and fuses into a single nucleus wit

Eve Dunn 2022-05-10 Answered
In nuclear fusion, the colliding particle unites with the parent and fuses into a single nucleus with a higher mass. Sometimes other small particles (n, p) are given off.
However, that is not the case for the reaction:
14 7 N + 1 0 n 14 6 C + 1 1 H
If so, why would you still consider it as a nuclear fusion? I have come up with a theory that it is because the carbon has an extra neutron than Nitrogen. Is this correct?
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Answers (1)

Gallichi5mtwt
Answered 2022-05-11 Author has 18 answers
This is a classic "neutron capture", not a fusion nor a fission. It naturally appears in troposphere and stratosphere where thermal neutrons are absorbed by nitrogen atoms. Cross section value for this thermal neutron capture: approx 1.8 b .
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