If the light velocity is a vector quantity, why vector

deformere692qr 2022-05-10 Answered
If the light velocity is a vector quantity, why vector addition cannot be applied to it? Or the light velocity is not a vector quantity?
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Answers (1)

nelppeazy9v3ie
Answered 2022-05-11 Author has 22 answers
The speed of light is a vector quantity and vector summation works perfectly well for it (at least in Special Relativity). You just cannot change the frame of reference.
For example if you have one object moving at c in one direction and another object moving at 1/2c in the opposite direction, then the middle between the two will move at c/2 in the same direction as the first. This is from point of view of a stationary observer.
The distance between the two objects grows as 3/2c. This is in the stationary reference frame of course, the objects themselves will see each other moving at speed of light.
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