An inertial frame of reference is a frame of reference which is not accelerating. All laws of physic

Azzalictpdv 2022-05-10 Answered
An inertial frame of reference is a frame of reference which is not accelerating. All laws of physics are the same measured from an inertial frame of reference. A rest frame is a frame of reference where a particle is at rest.
Does this mean that a rest frame could possibly be non-inertial (that is, accelerating), but the particle with respect to his rest frame would have a velocity of 0? What kind of velocity? And what exactly would it mean to be at rest with respect to a possibly accelerating frame of reference?
What are the differences and relations between rest frame and inertial reference frame?
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Answers (2)

tomatoland45wt8wm
Answered 2022-05-11 Author has 20 answers
Yes, a rest frame can be accelerated. Right at this moment I am seat at rest with respect to the Earth. However Earth itself is accelerated.
A rest frame associated to a particle will be inertial if the particle is free, i.e. it does not interact with anything. This is actually the first Newton's law and it gives a definition of an inertial frame.
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Alisa Durham
Answered 2022-05-12 Author has 3 answers
Consider your own personal rest frame, one with its origin at your center of mass. The acceleration of your center of mass with respect to your personal rest frame is tautologically zero. From this narcissist perspective, it's the Earth that is accelerating toward you when you parachute out of an airplane or bungee jump off of a bridge. Similarly from this perspective, the road accelerates backwards underneath you when you punch the accelerator on your car, and accelerates forwards when you hit the breaks.
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