The length of an arc of a circle is 12

adocidasiaqxm 2022-05-08 Answered
The length of an arc of a circle is 12 cm. The corresponding sector area is 108 cm 2 . Find the radius of the circle.
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Answers (1)

Erika Ayers
Answered 2022-05-09 Author has 9 answers
If θ is the central angle in radians and r is the radius, we can write the two following equations: r θ = 12 and 1 2 θ r 2 = 108. Dividing the first equation into the second, we have that 1 2 r = 9 , so r=18.
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