which axiom(s) are behind the Pythagorean Theorem There are many elementary proofs for the Pythagor

pevljivuaosyc 2022-05-07 Answered
which axiom(s) are behind the Pythagorean Theorem
There are many elementary proofs for the Pythagorean Theorem, but no matter they use areas, similarities, even algebraic proofs, it is not straightforward to tell why it is true tracing back to the (Euclidean geometry) axioms. Are all these proofs equivalent? Do they all track back to the same axioms?
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Answers (2)

Gia Schaefer
Answered 2022-05-08 Author has 11 answers
Sure, the Pythagorean theorem is an item in the theory of Euclidean geometry, and it can be derived from the modern axioms of Euclidean geometry.
A full set of Euclidean geometry axioms contains the information about similarity and area that are sufficient to prove the Pythagorean theorem "synthetically," that is, directly from the axioms. The algebraic proofs are a little different, though!
It turns out that after defining the real numbers and basic algebra, you can create a model of Euclidean geometry in R × R which obeys all the Euclidean axioms. The algebraic operations in an algebraic proof reflect the synthetic axioms being used, but the direct connections are not obvious. You are still indirectly using the synthetic axioms, but they are all hidden assumptions about R × R and coordinate geometry.
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llunallenaipg5r
Answered 2022-05-09 Author has 2 answers
Pythagoras is equivalent to the parallel postulate.
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Thank you!