In the one-variable case we can take a log transform of the function f ( x ) →

Bernard Mora 2022-05-07 Answered
In the one-variable case we can take a log transform of the function f ( x ) log ( f ( x ) ) and know that the same value maximizes both because log is increasing. The log turns products into sums which facilitates taking derivatives. Can the same argument be applied for multivariable cases? The question is: for a function f ( x , y ) if I wish to find the x , y that maximize f ( x , y ) are these the same x , y that maximize log ( f ( x , y ) )? My intuition is yes, nothing should be different in this multivariable case, but I desire a quick sanity check before setting off with computations. I would appreciate a rigorous proof or a counterexample.
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Answers (1)

heilaritikermx
Answered 2022-05-08 Author has 11 answers
Yes (as long as f takes positive values) since f ( x , y ) f ( x , y ) if and only if log f ( x , y ) log f ( x , y ).
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