I am to create a six character password that consists of 2 lowercase letters and 4 numbers. The lett

kulisamilhh 2022-05-03 Answered
I am to create a six character password that consists of 2 lowercase letters and 4 numbers. The letters and numbers can be mixed up in any order and I can also repeat the same number and letter as well. How many possible passwords are there?
What I have pieced together so far:
Well, from the fundamental counting principle, we would definitely need 26 2 × 10 4 but obviously this is not all the possibilities since I can rearrange letters and numbers. Since it is a password the order matters so would I try and do a permuation of some sort like 6 P 2 since there are 6 slots to try to rearrange 2 objects (letters)?
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Answers (1)

Volsa280
Answered 2022-05-04 Author has 16 answers
You're just a little wrong on the letters-numbers arrangement part; it's ( 6 2 ) = 15, not 6 P 2 = 30 (since we do the arrangement before the character assignment).
Now multiply this with your (correct) value of 26 2 × 10 4 character assignments to get the final answer: 26 2 × 10 4 × ( 6 2 ) .
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