If you have a bowl of ice that's melting, so the ambient temperature is just above 0 °C, what happen

Davon Trujillo 2022-04-30 Answered
If you have a bowl of ice that's melting, so the ambient temperature is just above 0 °C, what happens to the temperature of the water when you add salt?
I know that the freezing point of salt water is less than 0 °C (it goes down to around -21 °C for a fully saturated solution), but that's not what this question is about. There's no change in the ambient temperature.
Does adding the salt create a reaction that adds or removes heat? or does the temperature just remain the same?
You can still ask an expert for help

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

Solve your problem for the price of one coffee

  • Available 24/7
  • Math expert for every subject
  • Pay only if we can solve it
Ask Question

Answers (1)

alastrimsmnr
Answered 2022-05-01 Author has 18 answers
In the absence of salt, the ice and water at 0C are in equilibrium, so unless you add or remove heat nothing changes. However when you add salt it reduces the freezing point of the water. This means the ice and salt water are no longer in equilibrium, and the result is that the ice starts to melt.
Melting the ice requires heat. Specifically it requires the latent heat of fusion, and this heat has to come from somewhere. The heat comes from reducing the temperature of the water.
So when you add salt some of the ice melts and this cools the water. The temperature of the salt water reduces until the ice and salt water reach equilibrium again, which will be at a temperature of less than 0C. Add more salt and more ice melts and the temperature reduces further.
This is not a reaction, or at least not in the sense of a chemical reaction. It's just a redistribution of heat between the latent heat of fusion of the ice and the specific heat of the water.
Not exactly what you’re looking for?
Ask My Question

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

You might be interested in

asked 2022-07-18
The first law of thermodynamics
d Q = d U + p d V μ d N
is equivalent to saying: Q is a differentiable real valued function of U,V and N, so that we can write d Q = Q U d U + Q V d V + Q N d N, and Q U = 1. Also, we define p = Q V and μ = Q N
Is that it?
asked 2022-07-20
Is there a clear analogy here between volume and entropy? Looking at: d Q T = d S , d W P = d V
asked 2022-05-17
Calorimetry Problem
I was doing a problem in thermodynamics where the net heat is 0.
I don't understand why if you have say a copper calorimeter with water at say 15 °C and add a mass of copper at a higher temperature say 90 °C that when calculating the final temperature you would use for the copper piece this in the formula:
Q = m c ( T f T i )
Q = m c ( T f T i )
Where f is for final and i is for initial. Say mass is 0.3 kg. I was told that regarding T f T i I would need to use 90 T. This problem was to work out the final temperature of the system. Why was the initial 90 °C of the added copper substituted with T f in the heat equation?
asked 2022-07-17
An imaginary machine takes 9,000J of heat from a hot reservoir and 3,000 J of heat from a cold reservoir and produces 12,000 J of work. What can be said about this machine? O It violates both the first and second laws of thermodynamics. It violates the second law of thermodynamics but not the first law. It violates the first law of thermodynamics but not the second law. O It does not violate either the first or the second law of thermodynamics.
asked 2022-07-17
Suppose you mix two identical blocks of metal, one having a temperature of 10 and the other 20 . Is it possible for the cold block to cool to 5 C and the warm block to warm to 25 C?

A. Yes, because it adheres to the second law of thermodynamics.
B. No, because it will violate the zeroth law of thermodynamics.
C. Yes, because it adheres to the zeroth law of thermodynamics.
D. No, because it will violate the first law of thermodynamics.
asked 2022-05-13
Infer from a standard free energy change whether a reaction is exergonic or endergonic
asked 2022-05-14
Which will boil first? Assuming all variables are constant.
- Water in airplane at altitude of 20000 feet.
- Water in ship.
- Water near seashore.
- all of these will boil at same temperature

New questions