What does a z-score of –1.5 mean? A.The mean is 1.5 standard deviations less than the measurement. B.There is an error in the measurement. C.The measurement is 1.5 standard deviations less than the mean. D.The variance cannot be calculated because the z-score is negative.

sjeikdom0 2020-11-22 Answered
What does a z-score of –1.5 mean?
A.The mean is 1.5 standard deviations less than the measurement.
B.There is an error in the measurement.
C.The measurement is 1.5 standard deviations less than the mean.
D.The variance cannot be calculated because the z-score is negative.
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funblogC
Answered 2020-11-23 Author has 91 answers
Step 1
z-score:
The z score determines how far the individual measurement is from the value of mean. If the value of z score is negative then measurement is below the mean and if the value of z score is positive then measurement is above the mean.
Step 2
If the value of z score is -1.5, it determines that the measurement is 1.5 standard deviations below the value of mean.
Correct Answer: Option C. The measurement is 1.5 standard deviations less than the mean.
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