Prove an example of two independent samples and another example of dependent samples providing your reasoning To compare two means or two proportions,

rocedwrp 2021-01-27 Answered
Prove an example of two independent samples and another example of dependent samples providing your reasoning To compare two means or two proportions, one works with two groups. The group are classfied either aas independent or matched pairs. Independent groups meam that the two samples taken are independent, that is, sample values selected from one population are not related in any way to sample values selected from the other population. Matched pairs consist of two samples that are dependent. The parameter tested using matched pairs is the population mean. The parameters tested using independent groups are either population means or population proportion.
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Adnaan Franks
Answered 2021-01-28 Author has 92 answers
Suppose we want to compare the math scores between two classes in a school. The first class has say 70 students and second class has 65 students. The students of two classes are independent of each other. Suppose we select a sample of 20 students from first class and a sample of 18 students from second class. So, the two samples are independent.
Again suppose we want compare the performance difference in math and english exam in a class. We select 30 students from the class and noted their math and english test scores. Here, we obtain Math and English scores for the same set of students. So, the samples are dependent and matched pair test is applicable here.
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