You can use a scatterplot to estimate a value between two known values. Estimate the world production of oil when the United States produced 12% of the world's oil. Draw a scatterplot. Find 12% on the vertical axis. More horizontally to the line of points. Estiamte where the new point would fit in the pattern. Then move down to the horizontal axis. Oil Production 1960-2000 (billion barrels) World Oil production: 45.9, 52.8, 59.9, 68.3, 72.5 U.S. Percent of world Oil Production: 21, 16, 13, 9, 7

You can use a scatterplot to estimate a value between two known values. Estimate the world production of oil when the United States produced 12% of the world's oil. Draw a scatterplot. Find 12% on the vertical axis. More horizontally to the line of points. Estiamte where the new point would fit in the pattern. Then move down to the horizontal axis. Oil Production 1960-2000 (billion barrels) World Oil production: 45.9, 52.8, 59.9, 68.3, 72.5 U.S. Percent of world Oil Production: 21, 16, 13, 9, 7

Question
Scatterplots
asked 2020-10-26
You can use a scatterplot to estimate a value between two known values. Estimate the world production of oil when the United States produced 12% of the world's oil.
Draw a scatterplot.
Find 12% on the vertical axis. More horizontally to the line of points. Estiamte where the new point would fit in the pattern. Then move down to the horizontal axis.
Oil Production 1960-2000 (billion barrels)
World Oil production: 45.9, 52.8, 59.9, 68.3, 72.5
U.S. Percent of world Oil Production: 21, 16, 13, 9, 7

Answers (1)

2020-10-27
Step 1
Scatterplot World Oil
Production is on thehorizontal axis and U.S. Percent of World Oil Production is on the vertical axis. The World Oil Production ranges from 7 to 21, thus an appropriate scale for the horizontal axis is from 0 to 22. The U.S.
Percent of World Oil Production ranges from 45.9 to 72.5, thus an appropriate scale for the vertical axis is from 30 to 80.
image
Step 2
We draw a horizontal line at 12% until we arrive at the location where we expect the new point to fit in the pattern. Next, we draw a vertical line through this expected new point. We note then note that this vertical line intersects the horizontal axis at approximately 62 and thus the estimated world production of oil when the United States produced 12% of the world’s oil is expect to be 62 billion barrels. Result: 62 billion barrels.
0

Relevant Questions

asked 2021-05-05

A random sample of \( n_1 = 14 \) winter days in Denver gave a sample mean pollution index \( x_1 = 43 \).
Previous studies show that \( \sigma_1 = 19 \).
For Englewood (a suburb of Denver), a random sample of \( n_2 = 12 \) winter days gave a sample mean pollution index of \( x_2 = 37 \).
Previous studies show that \( \sigma_2 = 13 \).
Assume the pollution index is normally distributed in both Englewood and Denver.
(a) State the null and alternate hypotheses.
\( H_0:\mu_1=\mu_2.\mu_1>\mu_2 \)
\( H_0:\mu_1<\mu_2.\mu_1=\mu_2 \)
\( H_0:\mu_1=\mu_2.\mu_1<\mu_2 \)
\( H_0:\mu_1=\mu_2.\mu_1\neq\mu_2 \)
(b) What sampling distribution will you use? What assumptions are you making? NKS The Student's t. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with known standard deviations.
The standard normal. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with unknown standard deviations.
The standard normal. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with known standard deviations.
The Student's t. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with unknown standard deviations.
(c) What is the value of the sample test statistic? Compute the corresponding z or t value as appropriate.
(Test the difference \( \mu_1 - \mu_2 \). Round your answer to two decimal places.) NKS (d) Find (or estimate) the P-value. (Round your answer to four decimal places.)
(e) Based on your answers in parts (i)−(iii), will you reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis? Are the data statistically significant at level \alpha?
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are not statistically significant.
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are statistically significant.
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are statistically significant.
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are not statistically significant.
(f) Interpret your conclusion in the context of the application.
Reject the null hypothesis, there is insufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver.
Reject the null hypothesis, there is sufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver.
Fail to reject the null hypothesis, there is insufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver.
Fail to reject the null hypothesis, there is sufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver. (g) Find a 99% confidence interval for
\( \mu_1 - \mu_2 \).
(Round your answers to two decimal places.)
lower limit
upper limit
(h) Explain the meaning of the confidence interval in the context of the problem.
Because the interval contains only positive numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, the mean population pollution index for Englewood is greater than that of Denver.
Because the interval contains both positive and negative numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, we can not say that the mean population pollution index for Englewood is different than that of Denver.
Because the interval contains both positive and negative numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, the mean population pollution index for Englewood is greater than that of Denver.
Because the interval contains only negative numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, the mean population pollution index for Englewood is less than that of Denver.
asked 2021-05-18
Make a scatterplot for the data in each table. Use the scatter plot to identify and clustering or outliers in the data.
Value of Home Over Time
Number of Years Owned: 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21
Value (1,000s of $): 80, 84, 86, 88, 89, 117, 119, 86
asked 2021-02-19
A 10 kg objectexperiences a horizontal force which causes it to accelerate at 5 \(\displaystyle\frac{{m}}{{s}^{{2}}}\), moving it a distance of 20 m, horizontally.How much work is done by the force?
A ball is connected to a rope and swung around in uniform circular motion.The tension in the rope is measured at 10 N and the radius of thecircle is 1 m. How much work is done in one revolution around the circle?
A 10 kg weight issuspended in the air by a strong cable. How much work is done, perunit time, in suspending the weight?
A 5 kg block is moved up a 30 degree incline by a force of 50 N, parallel to the incline. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the incline is .25. How much work is done by the 50 N force in moving the block a distance of 10 meters? What is the total workdone on the block over the same distance?
What is the kinetic energy of a 2 kg ball that travels a distance of 50 metersin 5 seconds?
A ball is thrown vertically with a velocity of 25 m/s. How high does it go? What is its velocity when it reaches a height of 25 m?
A ball with enough speed can complete a vertical loop. With what speed must the ballenter the loop to complete a 2 m loop? (Keep in mind that the velocity of the ball is not constant throughout the loop).
asked 2021-03-29
Two stationary point charges +3 nC and + 2nC are separated bya distance of 50cm. An electron is released from rest at a pointmidway between the two charges and moves along the line connectingthe two charges. What is the speed of the electron when it is 10cmfrom +3nC charge?
Besides the hints I'd like to ask you to give me numericalsolution so I can verify my answer later on. It would be nice ifyou could write it out, but a numerical anser would be fine alongwith the hint how to get there.
asked 2020-12-25
Case: Dr. Jung’s Diamonds Selection
With Christmas coming, Dr. Jung became interested in buying diamonds for his wife. After perusing the Web, he learned about the “4Cs” of diamonds: cut, color, clarity, and carat. He knew his wife wanted round-cut earrings mounted in white gold settings, so he immediately narrowed his focus to evaluating color, clarity, and carat for that style earring.
After a bit of searching, Dr. Jung located a number of earring sets that he would consider purchasing. But he knew the pricing of diamonds varied considerably. To assist in his decision making, Dr. Jung decided to use regression analysis to develop a model to predict the retail price of different sets of round-cut earrings based on their color, clarity, and carat scores. He assembled the data in the file Diamonds.xls for this purpose. Use this data to answer the following questions for Dr. Jung.
1) Prepare scatter plots showing the relationship between the earring prices (Y) and each of the potential independent variables. What sort of relationship does each plot suggest?
2) Let X1, X2, and X3 represent diamond color, clarity, and carats, respectively. If Dr. Jung wanted to build a linear regression model to estimate earring prices using these variables, which variables would you recommend that he use? Why?
3) Suppose Dr. Jung decides to use clarity (X2) and carats (X3) as independent variables in a regression model to predict earring prices. What is the estimated regression equation? What is the value of the R2 and adjusted-R2 statistics?
4) Use the regression equation identified in the previous question to create estimated prices for each of the earring sets in Dr. Jung’s sample. Which sets of earrings appear to be overpriced and which appear to be bargains? Based on this analysis, which set of earrings would you suggest that Dr. Jung purchase?
5) Dr. Jung now remembers that it sometimes helps to perform a square root transformation on the dependent variable in a regression problem. Modify your spreadsheet to include a new dependent variable that is the square root on the earring prices (use Excel’s SQRT( ) function). If Dr. Jung wanted to build a linear regression model to estimate the square root of earring prices using the same independent variables as before, which variables would you recommend that he use? Why?
1
6) Suppose Dr. Jung decides to use clarity (X2) and carats (X3) as independent variables in a regression model to predict the square root of the earring prices. What is the estimated regression equation? What is the value of the R2 and adjusted-R2 statistics?
7) Use the regression equation identified in the previous question to create estimated prices for each of the earring sets in Dr. Jung’s sample. (Remember, your model estimates the square root of the earring prices. So you must actually square the model’s estimates to convert them to price estimates.) Which sets of earring appears to be overpriced and which appear to be bargains? Based on this analysis, which set of earrings would you suggest that Dr. Jung purchase?
8) Dr. Jung now also remembers that it sometimes helps to include interaction terms in a regression model—where you create a new independent variable as the product of two of the original variables. Modify your spreadsheet to include three new independent variables, X4, X5, and X6, representing interaction terms where: X4 = X1 × X2, X5 = X1 × X3, and X6 = X2 × X3. There are now six potential independent variables. If Dr. Jung wanted to build a linear regression model to estimate the square root of earring prices using the same independent variables as before, which variables would you recommend that he use? Why?
9) Suppose Dr. Jung decides to use color (X1), carats (X3) and the interaction terms X4 (color * clarity) and X5 (color * carats) as independent variables in a regression model to predict the square root of the earring prices. What is the estimated regression equation? What is the value of the R2 and adjusted-R2 statistics?
10) Use the regression equation identified in the previous question to create estimated prices for each of the earring sets in Dr. Jung’s sample. (Remember, your model estimates the square root of the earring prices. So you must square the model’s estimates to convert them to actual price estimates.) Which sets of earrings appear to be overpriced and which appear to be bargains? Based on this analysis, which set of earrings would you suggest that Dr. Jung purchase?
asked 2020-11-09
Two scatterplots are shown below.
Scatterplot 1
A scatterplot has 14 points.
The horizontal axis is labeled "x" and has values from 30 to 110.
The vertical axis is labeled "y" and has values from 30 to 110.
The points are plotted from approximately (55, 60) up and right to approximately (95, 85).
The points are somewhat scattered.
Scatterplot 2
A scatterplot has 10 points.
The horizontal axis is labeled "x" and has values from 30 to 110.
The vertical axis is labeled "y" and has values from 30 to 110.
The points are plotted from approximately (55, 55) steeply up and right to approximately (70, 90), and then steeply down and right to approximately (85, 60).
The points are somewhat scattered.
Explain why it makes sense to use the least-squares line to summarize the relationship between x and y for one of these data sets but not the other.
Scatterplot 1 seems to show a relationship between x and y, while Scatterplot 2 shows a relationship between the two variables. So it makes sense to use the least squares line to summarize the relationship between x and y for the data set in , but not for the data set in .
asked 2021-05-31
Make a scatterplot for the data.
Height and Weight of Females
Height (in.): 58, 60, 62, 64, 65, 66, 68, 70, 72
Weight (lb): 115, 120, 125, 133, 136, 115, 146, 153, 159
asked 2021-05-18
The student engineer of a campus radio station wishes to verify the effectivencess of the lightning rod on the antenna mast. The unknown resistance \(\displaystyle{R}_{{x}}\) is between points C and E. Point E is a "true ground", but is inaccessible for direct measurement because the stratum in which it is located is several meters below Earth's surface. Two identical rods are driven into the ground at A and B, introducing an unknown resistance \(\displaystyle{R}_{{y}}\). The procedure for finding the unknown resistance \(\displaystyle{R}_{{x}}\) is as follows. Measure resistance \(\displaystyle{R}_{{1}}\) between points A and B. Then connect A and B with a heavy conducting wire and measure resistance \(\displaystyle{R}_{{2}}\) between points A and C.Derive a formula for \(\displaystyle{R}_{{x}}\) in terms of the observable resistances \(\displaystyle{R}_{{1}}\) and \(\displaystyle{R}_{{2}}\). A satisfactory ground resistance would be \(\displaystyle{R}_{{x}}{<}{2.0}\) Ohms. Is the grounding of the station adequate if measurments give \(\displaystyle{R}_{{1}}={13}{O}{h}{m}{s}\) and R_2=6.0 Ohms?
asked 2021-02-23
Solid NaBr is slowly added to a solution that is 0.010 M inCu+ and 0.010 M in Ag+. (a) Which compoundwill begin to precipitate first? (b) Calculate [Ag+] when CuBr justbegins to precipitate. (c) What percent of Ag+ remains in solutionat this point?
a) AgBr: \(\displaystyle{\left({0.010}+{s}\right)}{s}={4.2}\cdot{10}^{{-{8}}}\) \(\displaystyle{s}={4.2}\cdot{10}^{{-{9}}}{M}{B}{r}\) needed form PPT
CuBr: \(\displaystyle{\left({0.010}+{s}\right)}{s}={7.7}\cdot{\left({0.010}+{s}\right)}{s}={7.7}\cdot{10}^{{-{13}}}\) Ag+=\(\displaystyle{1.8}\cdot{10}^{{-{7}}}\)
b) \(\displaystyle{4.2}\cdot{10}^{{-{6}}}{\left[{A}{g}+\right]}={7.7}\cdot{10}^{{-{13}}}\) [Ag+]\(\displaystyle={1.8}\cdot{10}^{{-{7}}}\)
c) \(\displaystyle{\frac{{{1.8}\cdot{10}^{{-{7}}}}}{{{0.010}{M}}}}\cdot{100}\%={0.18}\%\)
asked 2021-04-19
For the cellar of a new house a hole is dug in the ground, withvertical sides going down 2.40m. A concrete foundation wallis built all the way across the 9.6m width of the excavation. This foundation wall is 0.183m away from the front of the cellarhole. During a rainstorm, drainage from the streetfills up the space in front of the concrete wall, but not thecellar behind the wall. The water does not soak into the clays oil. Find the force the water causes on the foundation wall. For comparison, the weight of the water is given by:
\(\displaystyle{2.40}{m}\cdot{9.60}{m}\cdot{0.183}{m}\cdot{1000}{k}\frac{{g}}{{m}^{{3}}}\cdot{9.8}\frac{{m}}{{s}^{{2}}}={41.3}{k}{N}\)
...