Sketch a scatterplot where the association is nonlinear, but the correlation is close to [r = -1].

Question
Scatterplots
asked 2020-10-26
Sketch a scatterplot where the association is nonlinear, but the correlation is close to [r = -1].

Answers (1)

2020-10-27
An association is nonlinear when there is some curvature present in the scatterplot.
The correlation is close to [r = —1], when the pattern slopes downwards strongly and the points do not deviate much from this sloping downwards pattern.
For example, the following graph then has a correlation close to [r = —1] while also being nonlinear (note: The correlation of this particular graph is 0.8941).
0

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