How many zeros does a million and billion have. What is the equivalent lakhs and crore value of million and billion?

CoormaBak9 2020-11-08 Answered
How many zeros does a million and billion have. What is the equivalent lakhs and crore value of million and billion?
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funblogC
Answered 2020-11-09 Author has 91 answers
Result:
One million is 1,000,000 (6 zeros) and one billion 1,000,000,000 (9 zeros) although sometimes in British english is considered 1,000,000,000,000 (12 zeros) like in other european countries.
A lakh is equivalent to 100,000 decimal units and a crore 10,000,000 so:
- one million is 10 lakhs.
- one billion 100 crores or 10,000 lakhs
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