True or False. The domain of every rational function is the set of all real numbers.

Nannie Mack 2021-01-31 Answered
True or False. The domain of every rational function is the set of all real numbers.
You can still ask an expert for help

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

Solve your problem for the price of one coffee

  • Available 24/7
  • Math expert for every subject
  • Pay only if we can solve it
Ask Question

Expert Answer

Alannej
Answered 2021-02-01 Author has 104 answers
for example:
f(x)=1/x, the domain s not the set of all real numbers
RESULT:False
Not exactly what you’re looking for?
Ask My Question

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

Relevant Questions

asked 2021-02-25
True or False. The graph of a rational function may intersect a horizontal asymptote.
asked 2022-02-17

Does there exists some simple criteria to know when the primitive of a rational function of C[z] is still a rational function?
In fact my question is more about the stability of this property. Let P and Q two co' polynomials and let A and B two co' polynomials such that
AB=(PQ)=PQPQQ2
Then considering a pertubation Aξ of A (in the sense the roots of Aξ converge to the one of A with the same multiplicity as ξ goes to zero.): does AξB admit a primitive which is rational function?

asked 2021-05-22
The process by which we determine limits of rational functions applies equally well to ratios containing noninteger or negative powers of x: Divide numerator and denominator by the highest power of x in the denominator and proceed from there. Find the limits.
limxx2+1x+1
asked 2021-03-04
Rational number: wha is 0.02 as a rational number
asked 2021-09-13

The process by which we determine limits of rational functions applies equally well to ratios containing noninteger or negative powers of x: Divide numerator and denominator by the highest power of x in the denominator and proceed from there. Find the limits. limx((x1)+(x4))((x2)(x3))

asked 2022-05-24
If I have two algebraic numbers α and β and a rational function w with rational coefficients (a function that's the ratio of two rational polynomials) that relates the two α = w ( β ) if I were to substitute β with one of it's algebraic cojugates β in the rational function will I get a conjugate of α or rather is w ( β ) an algebraic conjugate of alpha? I feel like there is a very obvious counter example but I've been struggling to find one.
asked 2022-02-15
I have
n=0(1)n2nx(2n1)
It turns out that this series is equal to the function 2x(1+x2)2
Is there a general method that would demonstrate this fact beforehand?