You roll a die. If it comes up a 6,

IMLOG10ct 2021-11-23 Answered
You roll a die. If it comes up a 6, you win 100. If not, you gettoroll again. If you get a 6 the second time, you win 50. If not, you lose. Find the expected amount you'll win.
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Provere
Answered 2021-11-24 Author has 18 answers
Step 1
x$0$50$100P(X=x)56×56=253656×16=53616Prob. in decimals0.69440.13890.1667
Step 2
The expected value is the sum of the product of each possibility x with its probability P(X=x):
μ=E(X)=xP(x)=0×2536+50×536+100×16=85036$23.61
Thus the expected amount you will in $23.61
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Troy Lesure
Answered 2021-11-25 Author has 26 answers
Step 1
We have that "x" is the amount of money earned:
We have to fail twice, the probability of failure is 56 and the probability of hitting is 16, therefore if you lose the probability would be:
56×56=2536
The one to win 50 $, would be:
16×56=536
and the one to win $ 100 would be:
16+56=636
that is to say:
x$0$50$100$p(x)2536536636
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