Question

State the empirical rule for variables.

Normal distributions
ANSWERED
asked 2021-02-08
State the empirical rule for variables.

Answers (1)

2021-02-09
Step 1
The normal distributions are bell-shaped. Therefore the empirical rule can be stated as below:
Step 2
For the bell-shaped distributed variable,
The observations that lie within 11 standard deviation from the mean is around \(68.26\%\).
The observations that lie within 22 standard deviations from the mean is around \(95.44\%\).
The observations that lie within 33 standard deviations from the mean is around \(99.74\%\).
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