1950 randomly selected adults were asked if they think they are financially better off than their parents. The following table gives the two-way classification of the responses based on the education levels of the persons included in the survey and whether they are financially better off, the same as, or worse off than their parents begin{array}{|c|c|c|}hline &text{Less Than High School}&text{High School}&text{More Than High School}hline text{Better off} &140&440&430 hline text{Same as}&60&230&110 hline text{Worse off}&180&280&80 hlineend{array} Suppose one adult is selected at random from these 1950 adults. Find the following probablity. Round your answer to three decimal places. P(text{more than high school or worse off})=?

1950 randomly selected adults were asked if they think they are financially better off than their parents. The following table gives the two-way classification of the responses based on the education levels of the persons included in the survey and whether they are financially better off, the same as, or worse off than their parents begin{array}{|c|c|c|}hline &text{Less Than High School}&text{High School}&text{More Than High School}hline text{Better off} &140&440&430 hline text{Same as}&60&230&110 hline text{Worse off}&180&280&80 hlineend{array} Suppose one adult is selected at random from these 1950 adults. Find the following probablity. Round your answer to three decimal places. P(text{more than high school or worse off})=?

Question
Two-way tables
asked 2021-03-05
1950 randomly selected adults were asked if they think they are financially better off than their parents. The following table gives the two-way classification of the responses based on the education levels of the persons included in the survey and whether they are financially better off, the same as, or worse off than their parents
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|c|}\hline &\text{Less Than High School}&\text{High School}&\text{More Than High School}\\\hline \text{Better off} &140&440&430\\ \hline \text{Same as}&60&230&110\\ \hline \text{Worse off}&180&280&80\\ \hline\end{array}\\\)
Suppose one adult is selected at random from these 1950 adults. Find the following probablity.
Round your answer to three decimal places.
\(P(\text{more than high school or worse off})=?\)

Answers (1)

2021-03-06
Step 1
the summarized table is as follows:
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|c|}\hline &\text{Less Than High School}&\text{High School}&\text{More Than High School}&\text{Total}\\\hline \text{Better off} &140&440&430&1010\\ \hline \text{Same as}&60&230&110&400\\ \hline \text{Worse off}&180&280&80&540\\ \hline \text{Total}&380&950&620&1950 \\ \hline \end{array}\\\)
Step 2
The required probability is as follows:
\(P(\text{more than high school})=P(\text{More than high school})+P(\text{Worse off})-P(\text{more than high school and worse off})\)
\(=\frac{620}{1950}+\frac{540}{1950}-\frac{80}{1950}\) =0.558
0

Relevant Questions

asked 2021-01-06
The following table gives a two-way classification of all basketball players at a state university who began their college careers between 2004 and 2008, based on gender and whether or not they graduated.
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|c|}\hline &\text{Graduated}&\text{Did not Graduate}\\\hline \text{Male} &129&51\\ \hline \text{Female}&134&36 \\ \hline \end{array}\\\)
If one of these players is selected at random, find the following probability.
Round your answer to four decimal places.
\(P(\text{graduated or male})=\) Enter your answer in accordance to the question statement
asked 2021-05-05

A random sample of \( n_1 = 14 \) winter days in Denver gave a sample mean pollution index \( x_1 = 43 \).
Previous studies show that \( \sigma_1 = 19 \).
For Englewood (a suburb of Denver), a random sample of \( n_2 = 12 \) winter days gave a sample mean pollution index of \( x_2 = 37 \).
Previous studies show that \( \sigma_2 = 13 \).
Assume the pollution index is normally distributed in both Englewood and Denver.
(a) State the null and alternate hypotheses.
\( H_0:\mu_1=\mu_2.\mu_1>\mu_2 \)
\( H_0:\mu_1<\mu_2.\mu_1=\mu_2 \)
\( H_0:\mu_1=\mu_2.\mu_1<\mu_2 \)
\( H_0:\mu_1=\mu_2.\mu_1\neq\mu_2 \)
(b) What sampling distribution will you use? What assumptions are you making? NKS The Student's t. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with known standard deviations.
The standard normal. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with unknown standard deviations.
The standard normal. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with known standard deviations.
The Student's t. We assume that both population distributions are approximately normal with unknown standard deviations.
(c) What is the value of the sample test statistic? Compute the corresponding z or t value as appropriate.
(Test the difference \( \mu_1 - \mu_2 \). Round your answer to two decimal places.) NKS (d) Find (or estimate) the P-value. (Round your answer to four decimal places.)
(e) Based on your answers in parts (i)−(iii), will you reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis? Are the data statistically significant at level \alpha?
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are not statistically significant.
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are statistically significant.
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are statistically significant.
At the \( \alpha = 0.01 \) level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are not statistically significant.
(f) Interpret your conclusion in the context of the application.
Reject the null hypothesis, there is insufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver.
Reject the null hypothesis, there is sufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver.
Fail to reject the null hypothesis, there is insufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver.
Fail to reject the null hypothesis, there is sufficient evidence that there is a difference in mean pollution index for Englewood and Denver. (g) Find a 99% confidence interval for
\( \mu_1 - \mu_2 \).
(Round your answers to two decimal places.)
lower limit
upper limit
(h) Explain the meaning of the confidence interval in the context of the problem.
Because the interval contains only positive numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, the mean population pollution index for Englewood is greater than that of Denver.
Because the interval contains both positive and negative numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, we can not say that the mean population pollution index for Englewood is different than that of Denver.
Because the interval contains both positive and negative numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, the mean population pollution index for Englewood is greater than that of Denver.
Because the interval contains only negative numbers, this indicates that at the 99% confidence level, the mean population pollution index for Englewood is less than that of Denver.
asked 2021-01-19
A survey of 4826 randomly selected young adults (aged 19 to 25 ) asked, "What do you think are the chances you will have much more than a middle-class income at age 30? The two-way table summarizes the responses.
\(\begin{array} {c|cc|c} & \text { Female } & \text { Male } & \text { Total } \\ \hline \text { Almost no chance } & 96 & 98 & 194 \\ \hline \text { Some chance but probably not } & 426 & 286 & 712 \\ \hline \text { A 50-50 chance } & 696 & 720 & 1416 \\ \hline \text { A good chance } & 663 & 758 & 1421 \\ \hline \text { Almost certain } & 486 & 597 & 1083 \\ \hline \text { Total } & 2367 & 2459 & 4826 \end{array}\)
Choose a survey respondent at random. Define events G: a good chance, M: male, and N: almost no chance. Given that the chosen student didn't say "almost no chance," what's the probability that this person is female? Write your answer as a probability statement using correct symbols for the events.
asked 2020-12-29

The following two-way contingency table gives the breakdown of the population of adults in a town according to their highest level of education and whether or not they regularly take vitamins:
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|c|c|c|} \hline \text {Education}& \text {Use of vitamins takes} &\text{Does not take}\\ \hline \text {No High School Diploma} & 0.03 & 0.07 \\ \hline \text{High School Diploma} & 0.11 & 0.39 \\ \hline \text {Undergraduate Degree} & 0.09 & 0.27 \\ \hline \text {Graduate Degree} & 0.02 & 0.02 \\ \hline \end{array}\)
You select a person at random. What is the probability the person does not take vitamins regularly?

asked 2020-10-23
The table below shows the number of people for three different race groups who were shot by police that were either armed or unarmed. These values are very close to the exact numbers. They have been changed slightly for each student to get a unique problem.
Suspect was Armed:
Black - 543
White - 1176
Hispanic - 378
Total - 2097
Suspect was unarmed:
Black - 60
White - 67
Hispanic - 38
Total - 165
Total:
Black - 603
White - 1243
Hispanic - 416
Total - 2262
Give your answer as a decimal to at least three decimal places.
a) What percent are Black?
b) What percent are Unarmed?
c) In order for two variables to be Independent of each other, the P \((A and B) = P(A) \cdot P(B) P(A and B) = P(A) \cdot P(B).\)
This just means that the percentage of times that both things happen equals the individual percentages multiplied together (Only if they are Independent of each other).
Therefore, if a person's race is independent of whether they were killed being unarmed then the percentage of black people that are killed while being unarmed should equal the percentage of blacks times the percentage of Unarmed. Let's check this. Multiply your answer to part a (percentage of blacks) by your answer to part b (percentage of unarmed).
Remember, the previous answer is only correct if the variables are Independent.
d) Now let's get the real percent that are Black and Unarmed by using the table?
If answer c is "significantly different" than answer d, then that means that there could be a different percentage of unarmed people being shot based on race. We will check this out later in the course.
Let's compare the percentage of unarmed shot for each race.
e) What percent are White and Unarmed?
f) What percent are Hispanic and Unarmed?
If you compare answers d, e and f it shows the highest percentage of unarmed people being shot is most likely white.
Why is that?
This is because there are more white people in the United States than any other race and therefore there are likely to be more white people in the table. Since there are more white people in the table, there most likely would be more white and unarmed people shot by police than any other race. This pulls the percentage of white and unarmed up. In addition, there most likely would be more white and armed shot by police. All the percentages for white people would be higher, because there are more white people. For example, the table contains very few Hispanic people, and the percentage of people in the table that were Hispanic and unarmed is the lowest percentage.
Think of it this way. If you went to a college that was 90% female and 10% male, then females would most likely have the highest percentage of A grades. They would also most likely have the highest percentage of B, C, D and F grades
The correct way to compare is "conditional probability". Conditional probability is getting the probability of something happening, given we are dealing with just the people in a particular group.
g) What percent of blacks shot and killed by police were unarmed?
h) What percent of whites shot and killed by police were unarmed?
i) What percent of Hispanics shot and killed by police were unarmed?
You can see by the answers to part g and h, that the percentage of blacks that were unarmed and killed by police is approximately twice that of whites that were unarmed and killed by police.
j) Why do you believe this is happening?
Do a search on the internet for reasons why blacks are more likely to be killed by police. Read a few articles on the topic. Write your response using the articles as references. Give the websites used in your response. Your answer should be several sentences long with at least one website listed. This part of this problem will be graded after the due date.
asked 2021-06-04
You randomly survey shoppers at a supermarket about whether they use reusable bags. Of 60 male shoppers 15 use reusable bags. Of 110 female shoppers, 60 use reusable bags. Organize your results in a two-way table. Include the marginal frequencies.
asked 2020-11-26
A random sample of 2,500 people was selected, and the people were asked to give their favorite season. Their responses, along with their age group, are summarized in the two-way table below.
\(\begin{array}{c|cccc|c} & \text {Winter} &\text{Spring}& \text {Summer } & \text {Fall}& \text {Total}\\ \hline \text {Children} & 30 & 0 & 170&0&200 \\ \text{Teens} & 150 & 75 & 250&25&500 \\ \text {Adults } & 250 & 250 & 250&250&1000 \\ \text {Seniors} & 300 & 150 & 50&300&800 \\ \hline \text {Total} & 730 & 475 & 720 &575&2500 \end{array}\)
Among those whose favorite season is spring, what proportion are adults?
\(a) \frac{250}{1000}\)
\(b) \frac{250}{2500}\)
\(c) \frac{475}{2500}\)
\(d) \frac{250}{475}\)
\(e) \frac{225}{475}\)
asked 2021-01-27
One hundred adults and children were randomly selected and asked whether they spoke more than one language fluently. The data were recorded in a two-way table. Maria and Brennan each used the data to make the tables of joint relative frequencies shown below, but their results are slightly different. The difference is shaded. Can you tell by looking at the tables which of them made an error? Explain.
\(\begin{array}{c|c}&Yes&No\\\hline\text{Children}&0.15&0.25\\\hline\text{Adults}&0.1&0.6\end{array}\)
asked 2021-02-12
In 1912 the Titanic struck an iceberg and sank on its first voyage. Some passengers got off the ship in lifeboats, but many died. The following two-way table gives information about adult passengers who survived and who died, by class of travel.
\(\begin{array} {lc} & \text{Class} \ \text {Survived } & \begin{array}{c|c|c|c} & \text { First } & \text { Second } & \text { Third } \\ \hline \text { Yes } & 197 & 94 & 151 \\ \hline \text { No } & 122 & 167 & 476 \end{array}\ \end{array}\)
Suppose we randomly select one of the adult passengers who rode on the Titanic. Define event D as getting a person who died and event F as getting a passenger in first class. Find P(not a passenger in first class or survived).
asked 2020-11-09
A survey of 120 students about which sport , baseball , basketball , football ,hockey , or other , they prefer to watch on TV yielded the following two-way frequency table . What is the conditional relative frequency that a student prefers to watch baseball , given that the student is a girl? Round the answer to two decimal places as needed
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|c|}\hline &\text{Baseball}&\text{Basketball}&\text{Football}&\text{Hockey}&\text{Other}&\text{Total}\\\hline \text{Boys} &18&14&20&6&2&60\\ \hline \text{Girls}&14&16&13&5&12&60\\ \hline \text{Total}&32&30&33&11&14&120\\ \hline \end{array}\\\)
a) 11.67%
b) 23.33%
c) 43.75%
d) 53.33%
...