Calicillian is available as 125 mg tablet how many tablets are messed to give a dose of 375 mg

2021-10-18
Calicillian is Available as 125 mg tablet how many tablets are messed to give a dose of 375 mg

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Answered 2021-10-26 Author has 2252 answers

\(375 \div 125 = 3\)
Answer: 3 tablets

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