Let A, B, and C be sets. Show that (A-B)-C=(A-C)-(B-C)

Lewis Harvey 2021-07-28 Answered

Let A, B, and C be sets. Show that (AB)C=(AC)(BC)
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Expert Answer

Caren
Answered 2021-07-29 Author has 96 answers

If A, B, C is any set, then to prove the equation we need to use the various Seth identity laws

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I am really struggling to solve this one. I feel like I am missing the key part of the solution, so I would like to see how it's done.
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