Question

One hundred adults and children were randomly selected and asked whether they spoke more than one language fluently.

Two-way tables
ANSWERED
asked 2021-07-26
One hundred adults and children were randomly selected and asked whether they spoke more than one language fluently. The data were recorded in a two-way table. Maria and Brennan each used the data to make the tables of joint relative frequencies shown below, but their results are slightly different. The difference is shaded. Can you tell by looking at the tables which of them made an error?
image

Answers (1)

2021-07-27

We determine the marginal relative frequencies using Maria's table:

\(\begin{array}{c|c}&Yes&No&\text{Total}\\\hline\text{Children}&0.15&0.25&0.40\\\hline\text{Adults}&0.1&0.6&0.7\\\hline\text{Total}&0.25&0.85&1.1\end{array}\)

We determine the marginal relative frequencies using Brennan's table:

\(\begin{array}{c|c}&Yes&No&\text{Total}\\\hline\text{Children}&0.15&0.25&0.40\\\hline\text{Adults}&0.1&0.5&0.6\\\hline\text{Total}&0.25&0.75&1.0\end{array}\)

Maris's table is wrong because the number in the lower right cell is not 1. Brennan's table is correct.

Result: Maria's table

0
 
Best answer

expert advice

Have a similar question?
We can deal with it in 3 hours

Relevant Questions

asked 2021-05-21
One hundred adults and children were randomly selected and asked whether they spoke more than one language fluently. The data were recorded in a two-way table. Maria and Brennan each used the data to make the tables of joint relative frequencies shown below, but their results are slightly different. The difference is shaded. Can you tell by looking at the tables which of them made an error? Explain. Maria's table YesNo Children0.150.25 Adults0.10.6 Brennan’s table YesNo Children0.150.25 Adults0.10.5
asked 2021-01-27
One hundred adults and children were randomly selected and asked whether they spoke more than one language fluently. The data were recorded in a two-way table. Maria and Brennan each used the data to make the tables of joint relative frequencies shown below, but their results are slightly different. The difference is shaded. Can you tell by looking at the tables which of them made an error? Explain.
\(\begin{array}{c|c}&Yes&No\\\hline\text{Children}&0.15&0.25\\\hline\text{Adults}&0.1&0.6\end{array}\)
asked 2021-08-16
One hundred adults and children were randomly selected and asked whether they spoke more than one language fluently. The data were recorded in a two-way table. Maria and Brennan each used the data to make the tables of joint relative frequencies shown below, but their results are slightly different. The difference is shaded. Can you tell by looking at the tables which of them made an error? Explain. Maria's table YesNo Children0.150.25 Adults0.10.6 Brennan’s table YesNo Children0.150.25 Adults0.10.5
asked 2021-03-05
1950 randomly selected adults were asked if they think they are financially better off than their parents. The following table gives the two-way classification of the responses based on the education levels of the persons included in the survey and whether they are financially better off, the same as, or worse off than their parents
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|c|}\hline &\text{Less Than High School}&\text{High School}&\text{More Than High School}\\\hline \text{Better off} &140&440&430\\ \hline \text{Same as}&60&230&110\\ \hline \text{Worse off}&180&280&80\\ \hline\end{array}\\\)
Suppose one adult is selected at random from these 1950 adults. Find the following probablity.
Round your answer to three decimal places.
\(P(\text{more than high school or worse off})=?\)
...