Question

To clear the decimals in an equation, how do you determine what power of 10 to multiply each side of the equation by?

Decimals
ANSWERED
asked 2021-06-03
To clear the decimals in an equation, how do you determine what power of 10 to multiply each side of the equation by?

Answers (1)

2021-06-04
Analyze the equation for the term with the greatest number of decimal places in the given equation. The power of 10 is equal to the greatest number of decimal places of any term in the given equation.
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asked 2021-05-19
For digits before decimals point, multiply each digit with the positive powers of ten where power is equal to the position of digit counted from left to right starting from 0.
For digits after decimals point, multiply each digit with the negative powers of ten where power is equal to the position of digit counted from right to left starting from 1.
1) \(10^{0}=1\)
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asked 2021-08-08
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asked 2021-08-02
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asked 2021-05-09
The dominant form of drag experienced by vehicles (bikes, cars,planes, etc.) at operating speeds is called form drag. Itincreases quadratically with velocity (essentially because theamount of air you run into increase with v and so does the amount of force you must exert on each small volume of air). Thus
\(\displaystyle{F}_{{{d}{r}{u}{g}}}={C}_{{d}}{A}{v}^{{2}}\)
where A is the cross-sectional area of the vehicle and \(\displaystyle{C}_{{d}}\) is called the coefficient of drag.
Part A:
Consider a vehicle moving with constant velocity \(\displaystyle\vec{{{v}}}\). Find the power dissipated by form drag.
Express your answer in terms of \(\displaystyle{C}_{{d}},{A},\) and speed v.
Part B:
A certain car has an engine that provides a maximum power \(\displaystyle{P}_{{0}}\). Suppose that the maximum speed of thee car, \(\displaystyle{v}_{{0}}\), is limited by a drag force proportional to the square of the speed (as in the previous part). The car engine is now modified, so that the new power \(\displaystyle{P}_{{1}}\) is 10 percent greater than the original power (\(\displaystyle{P}_{{1}}={110}\%{P}_{{0}}\)).
Assume the following:
The top speed is limited by air drag.
The magnitude of the force of air drag at these speeds is proportional to the square of the speed.
By what percentage, \(\displaystyle{\frac{{{v}_{{1}}-{v}_{{0}}}}{{{v}_{{0}}}}}\), is the top speed of the car increased?
Express the percent increase in top speed numerically to two significant figures.
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